Episode 45

How to Find the Best Employees with Sam Beiler

“Some of your best employees are already working. The big question for companies is how do we get in front of those people?” - Sam Beiler

 

We are going through a major shift in supply and demand for labor. Employers across industries are having difficulties acquiring and retaining good employees. However, the show must go on, so how do we solve this issue and create opportunities for businesses and potential employees? 

 

There are plenty of creative and intelligent people paving the way to connect the right employees with the right businesses. By changing the approach to hiring, businesses can acquire the right talent in times where no one is out searching for jobs. 

 

Today’s guest aims to solve this problem with Boostpoint, a social media ad creation platform for recruiters, contractors, and other small businesses. Sam Beiler, CEO, and co-founder of Boostpoint, joins us to discuss the shifting employment market and steps you can take as an employer to attract and retain top talent.

 

Tune in for a timely discussion to shift your perspective and hear some useful tips!

Topics discussed in this episode:

  • How Sam started with social media advertising
  • How Sam founded Boostpoint
  • Boostpoint’s effort in solving the skilled labor shortage
  • The recent supply and demand changes
  • Best way to gain perspective employees
  • How Boostpoint helps with talent acquisition
  • Why it’s challenging to find key employees
  • Which employers are successful in gaining good workers
  • Mindset change to proactive seeking and outreach strategy
  • Best practices to crafting an ad and which platforms work the best
  • A small business’s journey with Boostpoint
  • Sam’s advice for young people on entrepreneurial pursuits
  • Books and podcasts that have inspired Sam
  • Relationships that have helped Sam on his entrepreneurial journey

 

Visit Boostpoint’s website to learn more about their services. If you’re interested in connecting with Sam directly, head to LinkedIn.

 

To hear more Construction Disruption episodes, visit us on Apple Podcasts or YouTube.


Connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, or LinkedIn.



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Transcript
Sam Beiler:

Rewind about three years ago where the leverage was a little bit different.

Sam Beiler:

Like the employers had, the leverage, as far as simple supply and demand.

Sam Beiler:

You put an open job out there and you'd usually get applicants.

Sam Beiler:

And, was fairly easy to fill positions.

Sam Beiler:

Fast forwarding to the present day it's just supply and demand has flip flopped.

Seth Heckaman:

Welcome to the Construction Disruption podcast, where we uncover the future of building and remodeling.

Seth Heckaman:

I'm Seth Heckaman of Isaiah Industries, manufacturer of specialty metal, roofing, and other building materials.

Seth Heckaman:

And today my co-host is Todd Miller, president of Isaiah Industries.

Seth Heckaman:

Our goal here at Construction Disruption is to provide timely and forward looking information regarding the construction world.

Seth Heckaman:

We have great conversations, spanning innovations, as well as trends and practices, building materials, the labor market, uh, and leadership.

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, today's guest is Sam Beiler, CEO, and co-founder of Boostpoint, a social media ad creation platform for

Seth Heckaman:

Sam, welcome to Construction Disruption.

Seth Heckaman:

Thank you so much for joining.

Sam Beiler:

Hey, thanks for having me.

Seth Heckaman:

So Sam, we've known you for a little while, uh, originally met back in your Equipter days and have watched you yeah,

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, to begin though, for our listeners who, who haven't met, you, uh, share a little bit about your story and how

Sam Beiler:

A hundred percent.

Sam Beiler:

Yeah.

Sam Beiler:

So I'll try to give the, the concise version of it.

Sam Beiler:

Um, but I, I grew up in the construction industry.

Sam Beiler:

Um, my, my dad, you know, started a roofing company back in the eighties and that's what I was doing, like coming outta high school and stuff.

Sam Beiler:

Um, and then the, the Equipter part of my story and kind of where I fit into to that company.

Sam Beiler:

There was, um, as, as dad was coming up with the idea of the Equipter, and for those that aren't familiar with the Equipter it's like a self-propelled

Sam Beiler:

Um, and so that, that company started, um, you know, early 2000s and, and, you know, I, I'm trying to figure out what I want to do in my career.

Sam Beiler:

It's like, Hey, here's, you know, family business, you know, you start working there and, um, and then.

Sam Beiler:

Late teen years, like 18, 19, you know, started getting a little bit interested in like more business side of

Sam Beiler:

And so spent about a two year stint in sales, direct sales and, um, learned a, a ton there.

Sam Beiler:

Um, naturally I'm, I'm kind of a, a, an introvert and that kind of got me out of my introvert box,

Sam Beiler:

But, um, yeah, it, it definitely helped hone some of the things that I, you know, even routine today.

Sam Beiler:

Um, but then the thing we were trying to figure out back, oh man, this would've been you know, seven, eight years ago.

Sam Beiler:

After we really had product- market fit at Equipter.

Sam Beiler:

You know, great customer reviews.

Sam Beiler:

Um, the, the product was getting close to perfected.

Sam Beiler:

I mean, no products ever perfect.

Sam Beiler:

They're always making improvements even, even on the Equipter today, but you know, it was, it was there.

Sam Beiler:

Um, and the challenge was, Hey, how do we, how do we get this in the hand of more contractors?

Sam Beiler:

You know, just that, that simple question, you know, the sales model is direct to end users.

Sam Beiler:

So it's not necessarily like a, a dealership network, like some trailer manufacturers or car dealerships,

Sam Beiler:

Um, and so marketing is something we had experimented with different types of tactics and stuff like that, and nothing like really clicked.

Sam Beiler:

We knew we had an idea that could scale, but you know, nothing really just made that happen like, like we were anticipating.

Sam Beiler:

So, um, I, I, I started, you know, just being more curious around marketing and advertising, um, then took over the marketing

Sam Beiler:

You know, this was again about seven, eight years ago and really started leaning into um, more modern ways of advertising.

Sam Beiler:

I mean like this, this simple frame of mind where I was at, there was like, Hey, we have a limited budget, but

Sam Beiler:

Um, and so we had done like, you know, trade shows, a lot of, um, you know, more traditional types of advertisings.

Sam Beiler:

And not so much on the, the digital side.

Sam Beiler:

Um, and then, you know, this was right when Facebook started becoming a thing for businesses, it was like

Sam Beiler:

And, um, but we long story short, we really leaned into that and that really helped grow our brand nationally.

Sam Beiler:

And I mean, we went and grew super rapidly, kind of on the backs of some of those newer um, methods of marketing and advertising.

Sam Beiler:

And then fast forwarding, a little bit kind of on the backs of some of that success that we saw with our own company,

Sam Beiler:

Um, and started seeing like some of the, the holes and the reasons why, I mean, practically, like for, you know, a lot of construction

Sam Beiler:

Um, or maybe the confidence or budget to go to a larger marketing agency to figure it out for me.

Sam Beiler:

And that was then the light bulb moment of Boostpoint where it was like, Hey, I, I feel like we can

Sam Beiler:

And then, so that put me on the journey of founding Boostpoint.

Seth Heckaman:

Very cool.

Seth Heckaman:

Well, yeah.

Seth Heckaman:

What a incredible example of what the power of good marketing and tapping into those new, kind of forward-thinking options are with Equipter.

Seth Heckaman:

It's like, it seems like every roofer in the country now has one or is envious of those roofers that

Seth Heckaman:

What's that been like for your family?

Seth Heckaman:

Family business for 30 years and, you know, roofing and then all of a sudden happen into not happen.

Seth Heckaman:

Worked really hard to get into this and, and the success that's come.

Sam Beiler:

Yeah, it it's been, it is, it's been amazing.

Sam Beiler:

It's been a really great journey.

Sam Beiler:

Um, I mean it it's, it's one of those.

Sam Beiler:

Um, one of the things I love about America and the entrepreneurial journey that's available for anyone.

Sam Beiler:

And I feel, uh, like my dad was really able to lean into that and, um, and really build something really great and bring the family into that.

Sam Beiler:

And it's been a great experience, yep.

Todd Miller:

I mean, really, if you talk about disruptors, the Equipter has been a huge disrupter in the roofing industry, it really has.

Todd Miller:

So, uh, kudos to your family.

Sam Beiler:

It has.

Sam Beiler:

And I think, I think some of that gave me, like, I, I wasn't necessarily one of those entrepreneurs that grew up 10, 15 years

Sam Beiler:

Um, and that type of story, but it just kind of grew on me and it's like, I see it's, it's the environment that I've always been in.

Sam Beiler:

And so the idea to, to start a software company, um, was it, it, it definitely, uh, felt like risk and, um, and all the things

Sam Beiler:

Um, just because of like, you know, that's, that's what, I've, what I've experienced and seen other people do around me.

Seth Heckaman:

Sure.

Seth Heckaman:

Well, yeah, being so close to the power of an idea and what can happen gives you all the more confidence I'm sure.

Seth Heckaman:

And, uh, why not your idea?

Seth Heckaman:

That's awesome.

Seth Heckaman:

And yeah, these two introverts here commiserate with you and the need to being forced to break that box when you have to go out and sell something.

Seth Heckaman:

So you have no other choice.

Sam Beiler:

No other choice.

Seth Heckaman:

Right.

Seth Heckaman:

So, so I knew, uh, Boostpoint originally founded as this platform for, you know, small businesses, home service companies to generate consumer leads.

Seth Heckaman:

Um, but watching you the last couple years, there's been this, uh, pivot to leveraging that software and, and technology and expertise to

Seth Heckaman:

So, uh, tell us how that happened and, and what that looks like then today.

Sam Beiler:

Yeah, so when we founded Boostpoint about three and a half years ago, like our mission was to

Sam Beiler:

Um, and at that point, you know, when you talk to the average construction company or company as a whole, the

Sam Beiler:

Like we need to build revenue.

Sam Beiler:

Um, and then this thing called COVID happened and kind of flipped the labor market.

Sam Beiler:

As we know it.

Sam Beiler:

Um, and then we just started hearing from our customers and other, other, other companies it's like the biggest barrier to growth changed

Sam Beiler:

Um, and so we, we listened to that and, and we were like, Hey, we feel like our platform can solve that problem as well.

Sam Beiler:

And, and so, I mean, there was just kind of a chain of events that kind of led us to really leaning into that primarily.

Sam Beiler:

I really believe it as a brand, as a company, like you, you want to do one thing better than everybody else versus trying to do,

Sam Beiler:

Um, and so we decided it was about a year, year and a half ago that after we, you know, saw some success with companies leveraging our

Sam Beiler:

gonna lean into and build the company around and, and tackle this problem, the labor shortage problem and how companies can leverage

Seth Heckaman:

Awesome.

Seth Heckaman:

So what, what are some of the details?

Seth Heckaman:

What does that look like?

Seth Heckaman:

And on the nuts and bolts of how Boostpoint helps and would love to hear like a case study or story about, you

Sam Beiler:

Absolutely.

Sam Beiler:

Yeah.

Sam Beiler:

So I may preface it with kind of what I've seen happen in the, in, in the, the, the labor field and, and, and, you know, you rewind about three

Sam Beiler:

Like the employers kind of had, had the leverage, you know, as far as simple supply and demand.

Sam Beiler:

You know, you, you put a, uh, an open job out there and you'd usually get applicants.

Sam Beiler:

And, you know, it was fairly easy.

Sam Beiler:

Not, not always, but like to, to fill positions.

Sam Beiler:

It wasn't, you know, for the most part, it was, you put the word out there and organically, you could often fill positions.

Sam Beiler:

Um, and fast forwarding to the present day it's just supply and demand has flip flopped.

Sam Beiler:

And so it's just harder, which means you need to get in front of prospective employees sooner.

Sam Beiler:

Um, and because like people aren't searching online job boards, like they used to.

Sam Beiler:

You know, it used to be like, you know, five years ago, Hey, you need to fill your position, throw something on Indeed, throw

Sam Beiler:

applicants and you could, you know, filter through those and find a couple key good employees where that's not the reality anymore.

Sam Beiler:

What we help, what we found through leveraging Facebook, Instagram, and the advertising platform of, of these.

Sam Beiler:

You can in a most, in the most cost-effective way, get in front of your prospective employees, even before they're searching for a new job.

Sam Beiler:

The reality is that 73% of, uh, of, of candidates are in this category of passive candidates.

Sam Beiler:

So they're not actively searching job boards, like Indeed, ZipRecruiter, um, and other platforms.

Sam Beiler:

Um, but if they'd be presented with an opportunity, they'd seriously consider it.

Sam Beiler:

And that's often where some of your best employees are, you know, where they're already working.

Sam Beiler:

Maybe they're not even looking for a new opportunity, but then the big question for companies is how do we get in front of those people?

Sam Beiler:

Um, and so that's where our platform really comes in.

Sam Beiler:

So, um, as far as like the, the practical, like how we jump in and help.

Sam Beiler:

You know, a, a HR team or talent acquisition team, or whoever manages hiring for a company can easily jump into our platform

Sam Beiler:

Facebook and Instagram without having a ton of like previous like Facebook ads experience or marketing experience as a whole.

Sam Beiler:

And our platform, you know, within five, ten minutes, you can launch a very targeted job ad, um, targeting the right people

Sam Beiler:

And then we also have a, a messaging component, automated like text messaging to engage candidates as they're coming in.

Sam Beiler:

Cuz then the second thing is like, all right, now that you've increased your applicant flow with qualified candidates.

Sam Beiler:

How do you connect with them quickly?

Sam Beiler:

Engage with them, you know, schedule interviews and ultimately get them hired.

Sam Beiler:

So our platform helps, you know, attracting, but then also, you know, through the hiring journey to connecting with

Seth Heckaman:

Wow, that's powerful.

Seth Heckaman:

And that, that stat, 73% are passive job seekers.

Seth Heckaman:

That's, you know, changes the perspective for sure.

Sam Beiler:

Yeah, it's huge.

Sam Beiler:

Like one example of a client we just talked to this week, they just started on our platform like three, four weeks ago, I believe.

Sam Beiler:

And they had, they were kind of like banging their heads up against their wall, cuz Indeed was the big source that they were leveraging prior.

Sam Beiler:

Um, and just applicant flow just was declining and declining and getting more and more expensive, um,

Sam Beiler:

And, and they started with our platform.

Sam Beiler:

And within the first two weeks, they were able to generate over 70 applicants and filled their three to five positions

Sam Beiler:

Um, and so it's been, it's been a, a really fun experience, you know, solving this problem for, for a lot of different companies.

Seth Heckaman:

Yeah, that's awesome.

Seth Heckaman:

It was, uh, Frank Farmer, a past guest on the podcast and, and one of our dealers who also is a consultant for home improvement companies.

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, he had a webinar last week about his hiring and recruiting practices.

Seth Heckaman:

And he made the point, similar point, that your ideal candidate is not out there looking for a job.

Seth Heckaman:

They're looking for someone else.

Seth Heckaman:

And you know, the Wall Street Journal, this either this morning or yesterday had a, an article with the headline, pretty

Seth Heckaman:

And so it's becoming not only are they not looking, but you know, even so they're in such dire need that, uh, the good ones are

Seth Heckaman:

So you have to break through and get that message proactively in front of 'em like you're helping people do.

Sam Beiler:

Yeah, that's, it's crazy.

Sam Beiler:

Just like it, it, the, like some of the stats behind what we feel every day in the hiring market is, I mean, you rewind about a year ago.

Sam Beiler:

There were about 7 million job openings in the US.

Sam Beiler:

Fast forwarding to now there's I believe over 11 million was March or April's numbers.

Sam Beiler:

And unemployment is down to about 3.7% and pre-COVID unemployment was 3.5%, uh, unemployment.

Sam Beiler:

So it's just like, those are the numbers that behind what we experience every day, that makes it difficult to find key employees.

Seth Heckaman:

Yeah, no doubt.

Seth Heckaman:

So as you're in the trenches with these clients, and it's a challenge for every organization, uh, regardless

Seth Heckaman:

Um, but I'm curious as you're in the trenches, working with them, trying to solve this problem, what, um, what has

Seth Heckaman:

Are there some key characteristics or practices for those that are making their way through?

Sam Beiler:

There are, great question.

Sam Beiler:

First it's first of all, a mindset shift.

Sam Beiler:

Um, the employers that still have this mindset of, we have the leverage, like we're the best company.

Sam Beiler:

People should just be, you know, knocking on our door to work for us, um, because we're better than everybody else.

Sam Beiler:

Um, that's just no longer the case, where really you need to think about it more like you think about

Sam Beiler:

You know, and think about it more in that way.

Sam Beiler:

It's like what types of, what types of strategies and resources do you put behind customer acquisition and kind of build those...

Sam Beiler:

Again, the, the easiest way to maybe communicate it is like, Hey, if, if, if you have a, a pretty complex and robust sales strategy, you know, map

Sam Beiler:

How to engage with them and actually have a real conversation with them and then how to ultimately, um, you know, hire

Sam Beiler:

Um, but that's kind of the, the easiest, like parallel, I think for our audience that would make sense.

Sam Beiler:

It's like, Hey, think about how do, how do you attract customers in your sales funnel and just create a version of that for recruiting

Seth Heckaman:

Sure, it's long been said the most valuable, uh, asset a company has, is a lead.

Seth Heckaman:

And you know, now though, in today's day and age, people are even, uh, more scarce and we need to figure it out, so that is great advice.

Seth Heckaman:

So as people dive into Boostpoint and changing that mindset, understanding they need to have proactive marketing and outreach strategy.

Seth Heckaman:

What, what are some of the best practices you've seen of crafting that ad, positioning that ad?

Seth Heckaman:

What platforms, you know, uh, those, um, yeah.

Seth Heckaman:

What have you seen work the best?

Sam Beiler:

So, I mean, there's a lot of different channels out there.

Sam Beiler:

Um, and when you think of traditional media, digital media and all of that.

Sam Beiler:

And, um, the reason we really leaned into the Facebook and Instagram platforms is because those are currently

Sam Beiler:

Um, and so, I mean, you just look at that active user base it's it's um, two thirds of the US population that still has a active

Sam Beiler:

And so it's like, those are still like, there's still older platforms.

Sam Beiler:

There's some newer platforms coming up, you know, TikTok, Snapchat, and stuff like that.

Sam Beiler:

But as far as the right here, right now, where you're gonna get the best bank for your buck is, is still the Facebook and Instagram platform.

Sam Beiler:

So, so it's, first of all, just defining the platforms, um, you know, that, that you feel are best for your company, but then.

Sam Beiler:

It's again, thinking strategically kind of like you do about, you know, customer marketing and advertising.

Sam Beiler:

It's like you don't, you, you need to be creative with the types of, you know, ads you're putting out there.

Sam Beiler:

Like instead of just copying and pasting a job description, you know, over to a Facebook ad, you think about like,

Sam Beiler:

You know, what type of headlines ad copy, um, you know, more, more writing it in a way of, instead of, Hey, these

Sam Beiler:

It's more, Hey, what are the things that are attractive about the position?

Sam Beiler:

And write more about that versus like traditional like job descriptions where it's more, Hey, you need to do this, you need to do this.

Sam Beiler:

You need to have these requirements.

Sam Beiler:

Um, and you know, those things.

Sam Beiler:

And then secondarily it's, it's understanding, um, what's the least amount of friction where you can still qualify applicants?

Sam Beiler:

Like some people think, oh, any platform you just throw something out there.

Sam Beiler:

Um, and people will just start responding, you know, regardless of, of like what conversion method you're using.

Sam Beiler:

And so what we've found works really well is leveraging, um, Facebook and Instagram's internal conversion pages.

Sam Beiler:

You know, think about just the details of conversions.

Sam Beiler:

Like if you're sending someone, if your call to action is to call this number or go to this website and find our careers page, you probably

Sam Beiler:

Again, think about someone on lunch, break, scrolling through their Facebook page.

Sam Beiler:

Like, are they, are they gonna actually call somebody and have a conversation.

Sam Beiler:

Like just the way people communicate are different these days.

Sam Beiler:

And we need to think about that even with recruiting.

Sam Beiler:

Again, some sort of like quick apply experience, um, for the conversion.

Sam Beiler:

And then ultimately it's like, you need to connect with these people as soon as possible.

Sam Beiler:

It's just the same.

Sam Beiler:

Like I know we know this all like in lead generation with connecting with customers.

Sam Beiler:

It's like, you know, if you're following up with your day, your leads the next day or two days later, they're basically dead.

Sam Beiler:

You know, but if you can connect with them within minutes, you know of, uh, of converting that's when you actually have a real

Sam Beiler:

And it's just the same with candidates and applicants applying for your open positions.

Seth Heckaman:

Sure.

Seth Heckaman:

Yeah, it becomes it's more and more obvious how paralleled this, uh, mindset needs to be.

Seth Heckaman:

So write an ad that either gains them pleasure or helps them avoid pain and what's in it for them.

Seth Heckaman:

And then yeah, get in touch with them quickly and easily.

Sam Beiler:

Yep, that's it.

Sam Beiler:

That's it.

Seth Heckaman:

Excellent.

Seth Heckaman:

So, uh, as, uh, as someone signs up with Boostpoint, I imagine that your team, um, helps your clients along through this process.

Seth Heckaman:

So I'm, I'm curious, what does that customer experience look like for a small business working with Boostpoint

Sam Beiler:

Yeah, a hundred percent.

Sam Beiler:

So, um, you know, once someone is like, Hey, you know, this seems like it might be a good fit for us.

Sam Beiler:

You know, we, you can go to boostpoint.com, find out about it, maybe schedule a demo.

Sam Beiler:

But then if someone is, you know, engages with us, like, Hey, we, we have open positions that we need to fill.

Sam Beiler:

Um, we have a customer, so we have, first of all, a platform, you know that we've built.

Sam Beiler:

We are a software company that is super user-friendly.

Sam Beiler:

You create an account and, um, it's pretty self explanatory, you know, just leveraging the software and the platform itself.

Sam Beiler:

But then we do have a customer success team as well.

Sam Beiler:

That does a handful.

Sam Beiler:

We have a custom onboarding experience, you know, we help, you know, you even tailor some of your first ad templates, you know.

Sam Beiler:

Hey show us some of your job descriptions.

Sam Beiler:

We'll go ahead and write several ads for you.

Sam Beiler:

Um, so that you're well equipped for, with even high-converting ads.

Sam Beiler:

Um, and then, but it's pretty simple.

Sam Beiler:

It's like, you know, getting your ads live as soon as possible and making sure you're equipped with the knowledge to, to do this on you

Seth Heckaman:

Awesome.

Seth Heckaman:

I know, yeah, definitely of interest and a huge value to many of the people who are listening and, uh, hope

Seth Heckaman:

Um, switching gears a little bit, I'm curious.

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, just, diving back into your story of starting Boostpoint.

Seth Heckaman:

Um, I'm sure it's been quite the adventure of, of diving into this, setting out starting a business, uh,

Seth Heckaman:

I know.

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, so curious, looking back on the last three and a half years, you know, what have you learned, uh, founding and running a startup?

Seth Heckaman:

And what advice would you have for another young person?

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, considering some sort of entrepreneurial pursuit.

Sam Beiler:

Um, it's, I mean, it's definitely something that's like really close to my heart.

Sam Beiler:

As far as like entrepreneurism, like starting a business myself, you know, going through all those

Sam Beiler:

Like you never really get out of that phase.

Sam Beiler:

I don't think in a business.

Sam Beiler:

Like I even look at my dad in their business.

Sam Beiler:

It's like you, no matter what, you'll have ups and downs, and it's not just the, the start of a business, but I do think it is a little concentrated.

Sam Beiler:

within the first several years of, of starting a business.

Sam Beiler:

And I think maybe a couple things of, uh, advice is like, you know, before you start a business, you, you wanna make sure you're

Sam Beiler:

Um, because, you know, I, I feel, I, I do appreciate the education and the excitement around entrepreneurialism.

Sam Beiler:

Like I talked to, you know, people that were starting businesses 20 years ago, and it wasn't like the cool thing to start a business, you know?

Sam Beiler:

Um, so I do appreciate that, but I think some of the things that I would caution with that is like

Sam Beiler:

Simply because of they're in love with the idea of starting a business versus actually being a master at their craft and, and

Seth Heckaman:

Great advice.

Seth Heckaman:

I think, yeah, it seems like the, uh, not to knock anyone, but like Grant Cardone just tells you to go out and do it.

Seth Heckaman:

And there are some elements though of you wanna make sure you have something to go out and do and can do

Sam Beiler:

You do and it's, it's, it's, it's that like, you need both of those things.

Sam Beiler:

Like you need to have the guts to jump off a cliff and figure it out on the way down.

Sam Beiler:

Um, but you do need to know what you're doing, you know, and have a strategy around that, um, to actually build something meaningful.

Todd Miller:

I'm curious, Sam, are there any books you've read or people you've followed or podcasts you listened to or anything that have

Sam Beiler:

Yeah, I'd, I'd say there are some.

Sam Beiler:

I'm, I'm not an avid reader.

Sam Beiler:

I will be completely honest about that.

Sam Beiler:

Um, but I feel sometimes we need to consume content or be around people that get us outside of our, the limitations of our own mindset sometimes.

Sam Beiler:

Um, and I think back of like, you know, four or five years ago, there were some particular things that I

Sam Beiler:

Like practically, one was a podcast that I like binge listened to.

Sam Beiler:

It was the Masters of Skill podcast by Reed Hoffman.

Sam Beiler:

And, um, back then, like I did a lot of traveling, spent a lot of time on the road at my time at Equipter.

Sam Beiler:

And I just like, listened to these stories, entrepreneurial stories of, you know, different tech startups, Airbnb,

Sam Beiler:

And just heard the snippets of their, of their stories.

Sam Beiler:

And it sparked a lot in me of ideas, but then also just the, the guts to actually do it.

Sam Beiler:

You know, when you actually see other people doing it and being successful in it, um, it gives you sometimes

Todd Miller:

Sure, certainly can give you that desire and confidence as well.

Sam Beiler:

Yeah, I definitely, I'm more of like a story learner.

Sam Beiler:

Like you gimme a book, that's all like full of the exact tactics of like how to do it and all of that stuff.

Sam Beiler:

I'll usually disengage pretty early.

Sam Beiler:

Um, sometimes I wish I could get through books like that a little bit easier, but I, I, I'm a pretty practical learner where I like, I see it.

Sam Beiler:

I see the general story and it's like, that's usually how I, uh, learn.

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, you know, uh, kind of dovetailing that question.

Seth Heckaman:

Mentorship has come up consistently on episode after episode of how key that has been in the development of, you know, successful people.

Seth Heckaman:

And obviously growing up in the family business, watch, you know, watching your dad, working with your dad, that's had to be a key relationship.

Seth Heckaman:

But I'm curious, have there been other really important relationships along the way that have helped you get to where you are?

Sam Beiler:

Yes for sure.

Sam Beiler:

Um, I, I'm a fairly young guy.

Sam Beiler:

I'm about 30 years old and I'm definitely sel-admittedly say I know very little and the more I learn, the more it

Sam Beiler:

Um, and it things that have helped fill those gaps for me though, I'd say above anything else have been relationships, you know, actual relationships

Sam Beiler:

And I really, I really recommend, like, I don't even often put the relationship mentor, like as a title on it.

Sam Beiler:

Um, I feel like some people are quick to do this, like, oh, here's my advisors or here's my mentors.

Sam Beiler:

And it's just more something, you know, to check off the box.

Sam Beiler:

But do you actually have real deep, meaningful conversations with people that, that make a difference?

Sam Beiler:

And I, I'd even like rec like sometimes is we want to have like the highest caliber of, of mentors.

Sam Beiler:

It's like, oh yeah, Grant Cardone is one of my mentors.

Sam Beiler:

Or like, cuz I met him one time or I read his books or something like that.

Sam Beiler:

Like I think it's more value if you find people that you can actually have genuine relationships with, um, and have real conversations.

Sam Beiler:

Um, versus, you know, trying to have a big name in your back pocket to impress people.

Sam Beiler:

It's not a ego thing.

Sam Beiler:

Like it needs to be a real value.

Seth Heckaman:

Sure sure.

Seth Heckaman:

Because it to really glean anything from it, you have to, you know, have that humility.

Seth Heckaman:

You, you know, you referenced earlier, the humility you, uh, are, have front and for, uh, forward for yourself

Seth Heckaman:

And if ultimately learning is just an ego thing, you gonna short circuit yourself along the way.

Seth Heckaman:

Um, so that's awesome and refreshing and yeah.

Seth Heckaman:

As someone who prays to have a level of humility and operate that way, to me, it seems like a no-brainer, cuz this everything

Sam Beiler:

Yeah, it takes a level of humility and transparency.

Sam Beiler:

That's scary a little bit as well.

Sam Beiler:

Like, um, putting on a facade of everything's always okay will also be a way to short circuit real value.

Sam Beiler:

Like you need, if you do have relationships with mentors, advisors, you need to be willing to completely transparent,

Sam Beiler:

Um, and you need to talk about those things.

Seth Heckaman:

Something about being vulnerable, right?

Seth Heckaman:

It's uh, yeah, you can't, if you're not honest in the first place.

Seth Heckaman:

That's awesome.

Seth Heckaman:

Thank you for sharing all that and, uh, being vulnerable here of, uh, in that same way.

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, well, this has been great, love hearing your story and, and, uh, you know, uh, picking up these tips and tactics from you.

Seth Heckaman:

Um, we are reaching the end of, end of our time.

Seth Heckaman:

Um, but before we wrap up, uh, did want to invite you to participate in something we have fun doing

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, so our listeners are accustomed to it at this point, but as always, if Sam agrees, he does not know, uh, what these quick hit,

Sam Beiler:

A hundred percent.

Sam Beiler:

I'm always down for everything.

Seth Heckaman:

Awesome here.

Seth Heckaman:

So we'll alternate these questions here.

Seth Heckaman:

I'll let Todd go first.

Seth Heckaman:

And there, I don't think I've said there's seven of 'em.

Sam Beiler:

I'll count on my fingers.

Seth Heckaman:

Have to bear, uh, bear with us through seven.

Todd Miller:

Okay, question number one.

Todd Miller:

What is your favorite hobby?

Sam Beiler:

Okay.

Sam Beiler:

Used to be like photography and videography now it's food.

Seth Heckaman:

Cooking or just eating?

Sam Beiler:

Cooking.

Sam Beiler:

So like, like, I mean, this time of year now we're getting into smoking meats, grilling, all of that, but this winter a lot, it

Seth Heckaman:

Awesome.

Seth Heckaman:

Very cool.

Seth Heckaman:

Question number two.

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, do you prefer the top or bottom half of the bagel?

Sam Beiler:

Top all the way, like, especially on everything bagels.

Sam Beiler:

So my, my, my wife, she, she, she's learned the art of sourdough.

Sam Beiler:

About four years ago, like she teaches classes and has a whole brand around it right now.

Sam Beiler:

Shout out there retbakes.com.

Sam Beiler:

if anyone's wondering, but she makes sourdough bagels, everything bagels.

Sam Beiler:

And it's the top all the time, big slather cream cheese, let's go.

Todd Miller:

I'm there with you.

Todd Miller:

Question, oh, what was her website again?

Todd Miller:

Lemme make sure I hear that right.

Sam Beiler:

Retbakes, R E T bakes.com.

Todd Miller:

Awesome.

Todd Miller:

I, I thought you said rat bakes at first and I'm more I'm thinking, I'm thinking that just doesn't sound good.

Todd Miller:

Retbakes.com, check it out.

Todd Miller:

Question three.

Todd Miller:

Um, if you could trade places with anyone in the world, who would you trade places with?

Sam Beiler:

Myself.

Todd Miller:

Yourself.

Todd Miller:

Awesome.

Sam Beiler:

I have four young kids right now, like a wife.

Sam Beiler:

We just had our 10th year anniversary and I pretty much have the best life in the world because of those humans.

Todd Miller:

Oh, that's cool.

Seth Heckaman:

Awesome, bliss.

Seth Heckaman:

So, where do you want to take all those humans on a bucket list vacation?

Sam Beiler:

Australia.

Sam Beiler:

That one's been on my bucket list for like 15, 20 years.

Sam Beiler:

Like ever since I was like a teenager, I'm like, I wanna go to Australia, but never been yet.

Todd Miller:

That's a long flight, but a neat place to visit.

Todd Miller:

Okay.

Todd Miller:

Next question.

Todd Miller:

What's the worst haircut you've ever had.

Sam Beiler:

A buzz cut.

Todd Miller:

cut, huh?

Sam Beiler:

Definitely a buzz cut.

Sam Beiler:

Last one was probably when I was like 13.

Seth Heckaman:

Question number six.

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, this is a, yeah, a standby, old standby question here in rapid-fire.

Seth Heckaman:

If you had to eat a crayon, what color would you choose?

Sam Beiler:

My dogs go for red.

Sam Beiler:

So let's go red.

Sam Beiler:

it must be better than the other colors according to them.

Todd Miller:

Okay.

Todd Miller:

That's the most unique answer we've had.

Todd Miller:

I like that.

Todd Miller:

Haven't had dogs before that ate crayons, so good, good deal.

Todd Miller:

Okay.

Todd Miller:

Last question.

Todd Miller:

What is the best advice you've ever received from someone?

Sam Beiler:

Ooh.

Sam Beiler:

Alright.

Sam Beiler:

I'll choose this one.

Sam Beiler:

That that's a hard question.

Sam Beiler:

That's a hard question, but, but what comes to mind is, and there's a number of, of, of folks that have

Sam Beiler:

It is you, you have to believe in yourself.

Sam Beiler:

Like whether you're starting a business or what, whatever you're doing.

Sam Beiler:

Like you have to have the core belief of, of, of that, you can do this.

Todd Miller:

That's a good answer.

Seth Heckaman:

Awesome.

Todd Miller:

Or good advice like it.

Seth Heckaman:

Powerful.

Seth Heckaman:

Well, thank you so much, Sam.

Seth Heckaman:

This has, uh, been a pleasure, and blessed me to have this conversation.

Seth Heckaman:

Is there anything that, uh, we haven't talked about that you would like to cover before we wrap?

Sam Beiler:

I don't think so; this was great.

Sam Beiler:

I really appreciate this.

Sam Beiler:

It was a great time, really enjoyed it.

Seth Heckaman:

Thank you again, uh, for those that wanna get in touch with you directly, or, or boost point, what's the best way to do.

Sam Beiler:

Yeah, more info on Boostpoint, just go to boostpoint.com and then, uh, for LinkedIn, I'm fairly active on LinkedIn.

Sam Beiler:

So, uh, maybe connect with me there.

Sam Beiler:

Just LinkedIn/SamBeiler.

Sam Beiler:

I think it is, uh, B E I L E R.

Seth Heckaman:

Thank you.

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, again, Sam, and thank you.

Seth Heckaman:

Those of you for listening and tuning into another episode of Construction Disruption with Sam Beiler of Boostpoint, uh,

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, please watch for future episodes of our podcast as always, we have many more great guests on tap, and don't forget if

Seth Heckaman:

Uh, so thank you again.

Seth Heckaman:

God bless and take care.

Seth Heckaman:

This is Isaiah Industries signing off until the next episode of Construction Disruption.